Category Archives: Film School

Choosing Lenses for Video

Prior to the advent of DSLR video, having interchangeable lenses on a digital video camera was a privilege reserved only for the likes of Peter Jackson and Hollywood’s elite. The 5D MkII gave consumers cinematic possibilities that rivalled the most expensive digital cameras of the day. Alongside super shallow depth-of-field and incredible low-light performance, came a rich lens library that extended deep into the archives of photographic lens manufacturers. Today, we are spoilt for choice when it comes to compatible glassware, regardless of whether you’re shooting on a DSLR, mirrorless body, or professional grade video camera. Yet having such a wealth of choice is a blessing that can at times feel overwhelming. However, it’s always worth remembering that the majority of lenses are designed with photographers in mind. When choosing lenses for video, and more specifically, the kind of video that you will be shooting, your options will be greatly reduced. Continue reading Choosing Lenses for Video

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Live Music Videos with Tom Green and the Ligeti Quartet

We’re big music fans here at Aglow Films, and love working with bands and musicians, especially when they’re as talented as these guys! Contemporary classical composer and guitarist, Tom Green, came to us with the challenge of filming a series of live music videos, featuring himself and renowned chamber band, the Ligeti Quartet. They were looking for something polished and professional, with high-end camera work and cinematic lighting. As with most musicians, their budget was tight and their expectations high! Cost and time constraints allowed for only one day of filming, in which they were hoping to record four tracks! This meant the shoot had to be planned meticulously, with no room for errors. Needless to say, we bossed it… Continue reading Live Music Videos with Tom Green and the Ligeti Quartet

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Hollywood: Factory Line Thought

The screen is the new personal religion, always with you, omnipresent, omniscient; it is the reflection of our own psyches, a collective delirium. The screen is also the revelation: it is the mind, the collective mind, a mutual hallucination. The screen swallows us up. The screen world encroaches into our own, just as formerly Shakespeare’s characters and their subtle philosophies crept into our common imagination. The real and the cine-real follow endless inversions of each other. Life imitates art. Art imitates life. The screen shapes our cognitive processes and thus influences our perceptional tendencies: increasingly, we make sense of the world through a cinematic lens. Our thought processes employ the language of cinema in imposing order on life’s chaos. The filmic cosmos fills our world, filmic beings hovering in the middle distance between thought and experience, migrating from the screen to our collective subconscious, and contaminating our minds with nonsense. The twenty-first century psyche is peopled with Hollywood phantoms, its history, its sensibility, its capacity to feel, such as it is. These phantoms lay dormant in your head where they quietly evolve. Being born in the Matrix, our only notion of change is within the Matrix. We can rearrange the furniture, but the building remains the same. The dominant form of this this intellectual infestation is Hollywood cinema.   Continue reading Hollywood: Factory Line Thought

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A Psyche Born on the Screen

The twenty-first century psyche is peopled with cinema’s phantoms, abstract beings which secretly evolve inside us, working our hearts and our minds with a silent patience, a slow art, in much the same way the winds quietly carve mountains from absolute rock. Migrated from the screen to our collective subconscious, they thrive. Just as our ways of experiencing reality have become increasingly dominated by screen media, so too have our ways of understanding such experience – our ways of thinking and feeling – come into the orbit of these cinematic worlds. Of course, people have always turned to narrative constructs, to stories, in order to make sense out of life, complex and confusing as it can be. Stories give us an anchor-point in the confusion, helping us not to be lost. They provide moral, intellectual, and emotional guidance: various cognitive grooves through which to channel the great experiential variety of living. Continue reading A Psyche Born on the Screen

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